War on the Unexpected -- Schneier's dynamite essay on the War on Terror

Bruce Schneier has written a stunning essay on the War on Terror, explaining how it has devolved into a "War on the Unexpected" -- an arms-flapping hysterical world where every suspicion must be reported and investigated, and where every cop in the chain is encouraged to escalate every report. Governments are asking us to spy on our neighbors, to fink out the people on the plane with us, even asking meter-readers to snoop on our homes (!), but as Schneier says, "If you ask amateurs to act as front-line security personnel, you shouldn't be surprised when you get amateur security."

We need to do two things. The first is to stop urging people to report their fears. People have always come forward to tell the police when they see something genuinely suspicious, and should continue to do so. But encouraging people to raise an alarm every time they're spooked only squanders our security resources and makes no one safer.

We don't want people to never report anything. A store clerk's tip led to the unraveling of a plot to attack Fort Dix last May, and in March an alert Southern California woman foiled a kidnapping by calling the police about a suspicious man carting around a person-sized crate. But these incidents only reinforce the need to realistically asses, not automatically escalate, citizen tips. In criminal matters, law enforcement is experienced in separating legitimate tips from unsubstantiated fears, and allocating resources accordingly; we should expect no less from them when it comes to terrorism.

Equally important, politicians need to stop praising and promoting the officers who get it wrong. And everyone needs to stop castigating, and prosecuting, the victims just because they embarrassed the police by their innocence.

Causing a city-wide panic over blinking signs, a guy with a pellet gun, or stray backpacks, is not evidence of doing a good job: it's evidence of squandering police resources. Even worse, it causes its own form of terror, and encourages people to be even more alarmist in the future. We need to spend our resources on things that actually make us safer, not on chasing down and trumpeting every paranoid threat anyone can come up with.


(Thanks, Bruce!)

(Via Boing Boing.)